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When I went in to “retirement” (too sick to work), about 10 years ago, I decided to make use of my time study things that Science ~~ and people, at large ~~ are perplexed by — like, dreams and spirit matters.  Here’s what I know about dreams.             
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When you go to sleep, your mind does not stop.  It continues to think, just as it does while you are awake.  But, while you are sleeping, it has time to develop thoughts because it is not involved in daily (awake) activities.                    Photobucket
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When you are awake, your “conscious” (fore-most thoughts) are constantly being disrupted by “more-subconscious” thoughts — those you don’t need, want, or have time to think about in depth (like, your immediate environment, people that pass by you, what you’ll do on the weekend, what you’ll have for dinner, what you need to add to your grocery list, your appearance, old friends… the list could be endless).  But, by the very nature of sleep, your mind’s activity is slower and takes the time to see, more clearly, many of those “more sub-conscious” thoughts.  For example:  A person who passed by you, while awake, may have looked like an old friend, even barely, or wearing a style of clothing you associate with an old friend — but because you’re in a conversation with the boss, or rushing to get to work on time, or chasing the kids, you don’t give it “much thought” [little or no fore-thought].  However, when you go to sleep, later (even weeks, months, or more later), the scene (of the passer-by) might play back in your head and you might think about that old friend (thus, “dream” about him/her).  Here’s where it might get a little complex:  That friend might remind you of another friend, or a color, an activity, an argument — anything — and your mind might go off in another direction (away from the initial friend).  So, your dreams ~~ or what you remember of them ~~ may seem “crazy”.                                                                               Photobucket

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“Why do dreams seem so crazy?”  If you can dissect your awake thoughts into micro-seconds, or micro-thoughts, you will see how your mind works a little better.  Let’s use the Passer-by example, above:  If you “stop” your thought on the moment you noticed the passer-by and take the time to think about anything (even remotely) related to the awareness (the friend, what he/she wore, things you did together, places you two talked about going, etc.), it might explain how “crazy things” show up in your dreams.  The mind, when asleep, has time to wander and make associations.  Images or scenes may seem blurred in a dream because that’s how some thoughts go through your mind during awake time, or that’s all you remember about that scene in the dream, or you remember the moment when your mind was changing thoughts.
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“What about ‘sexual objects’ in dreams?”  The notion that if bananas, melons, and a long list of other things, appear in dreams, they represent deep-routed sexual problems or sexual needs that are not (and need to be) addressed is absurd.  (The first time I recall ever seeing bananas in a dream was after spending a week of discussing dream interpretations with some friends.  In the dream, someone held up a bunch of bananas and I gasped, “OMG!  I have sexual problems!”  Maybe it woke me up!  I quickly rationalized, however, and cautiously, that my mind was only reflecting those recent discussions.  The more you make associations between objects and sex, in awake hours, the more apt you are to incorporate them in to your dreams — merely because those associations are part of your awake life.

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“What is REM sleep?”    Rapid Eye Movement.  This is a period of sleep when the eyes and eyelids “jitter” and lasts, usually, briefly.  If I remember correctly (without looking it up), this is the only period that scientists think a person is dreaming.  Not at all true, in my opinion.  Periods when there is rapid eye movement are periods when there may be fast action, or the dreamer’s eyes are moving quickly around a scene, in a dream.   For example, if the dream scene is a busy playground and the dreamer is looking at all the children playing, it might cause REM.  REM, by no means, is the only time a person is dreaming. 

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“Does everyone dream?”  Yes.  Dreams are merely thoughts (and images associated with them) that occur while sleeping.  The mind does not turn off when asleep; it does, however, rest and takes time to develop thoughts.  We all think when we’re asleep. 

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“If it’s true that I dream, why don’t I remember?”   If your asleep thoughts are a lot like awake thoughts, you might not notice any difference between them — and, therefore, the “dreams” don’t stand out (as having dreamed).  If you do not take time to think about dreams, when you wake up, they are apt to be buried in thoughts of the day.  (I found the more I thought about my dreams, when I woke up, the more and more I remembered about them.) 

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“Sometimes, I dream I’m falling and I always wake up before I hit the floor.  Why is that?”  It could be you know it will hurt if you do hit the floor.  It could be, in dreams, we put ourselves in situations where we do, or might, fall and wake ourselves up (or stop thinking about it) and stop the fall, because we don’t want it to happen.  There are times, however, when we might allow ourselves to to hit the floor or, even, go through the floor.  See “Can analyzing our dreams benefit us?”, below.     

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“I sometimes dream I’m slipping and wake up with a jerk.  Why?”  Much the same as “falling” in dreams, you stop yourself from hitting the ground because you know it will hurt.  There may be a little more to it.  See “Can analyzing our dreams benefit us?”, below. 

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“Can analyzing our dreams benefit us?”  Yes, I think so.  It helps let you know what’s going on in your head, more deeply, and what paths our minds take in thoughts that might effect our actions during awake periods.  We make associations between words and actions, so it might help you control, or, at least, be aware of conditions.  That is, for example, if, in a dream, you are in a car, racing out of control, is that how your life seems to be going?  You could take it as a sign that (1) you are fully aware of it and (2) you might need to slow it down and get control, make life more manageable.  Keep in mind, these are thoughts you could have during the day, if you had time, or allowed yourself to think about them.  (When you are asleep, your mind is only thinking things it might if you were awake and had time (or took time) to consider them.)   If you are falling, in a dream, do you feel like you are “falling” (declining) in awake life, in other ways — health wise, financially, socially?  It could be actual, (or) it could be merely a fear.  If you see a banana peel or patch of ice, and still slip on it, anyway, how apt are you to see “slips” in your awake life — slips of the tongue, slips socially, on the job — and not avoid them (change the conditions so the slips don’t happen)?   Dreams can (probably) only tell us what we are, already, aware of, but we can use dreams to bring some things to the surface (of our conscience) a little more.  If we take time to think about our dreams, we can look for things that we may need to pay a little more attention to.  But, again, they are things that you would, probably, pay attention to (think about) if you had time, took time during awake hours.

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